AG PONT-NEUF OFFICE BUILDING AND CONFERENCE CENTER

BRUSSELS, BELGIUM

The AG Building was designed and built for AG Insurance the largest private landowner of Belgium. This new building is an integral part of the Rue de laeken ~ Rue du Pont Neuf Reconstruction Project (Link to project).

At a time when most corporations were leaving the center city, AG wanted to maintain their headquarters in downtown Brussels adding new office space and conference center.

AG - 15. phasing site plan.jpg

photo 5 (AG1)_edited.JPG

agagagagagag_edited.JPG

agagag_edited.JPG

Laeken tearing down tower  (2)-1.jpg

AG3_edited.JPG

photo 4AG (2)_edited.JPG

AG - 20. phase 2 from interior court jpg.jpg

AG5_edited.JPG

AG - 18. tower demo from interior court .jpg

AG - 17. tower demolition from street.jpg

AG bldge wings with tower.png

AG - 5.interior court & facade 2 _edited.jpg

AG - 4. interior court & facdes_edited.jpg

AG - 3. new Pont Neuf corner.jpg

AG Blue Tower corner view.png

AG - 7. entrance vestibul .jpg

AG - 8. Reception desk .jpg

AG - 9. audit view podium.jpg

AG - 13. typical office floor : side view.jpg

AG - 11. auditorium corridor.jpg

AG - 14. typical office floor coffee corner .jpg

AG - 10. auditorim lobby.jpg

Built: 1992-5

Size: 18,000m2 plus underground parking 

Materials: Concrete structure, stucco facade, wood casement windows

Design Architect: Joanna Alimanestianu, 

Architect of Record: Les Architectes Polak 

Design Team: M.Pierard, Ch.Washer, F.Gatti

 

This new building replaced the existing Blue Tower, a 9 story, podium type tower barely 15 years old. This glass and steel tower was the first to be raised in Brussels. First two wings were built on either side of the Blue Tower. The employees of the Tower then moved into both new spaces. The Blue Tower was demolished and the central core with main entrance was built connecting the two wings to create an L-shaped building along two perpendicular streets.

 

This building was the first low-rise office building with stucco facades, traditional wood windows, and slopped roofs with mansard windows, to be built in Brussels after WW2.

 

This new building reconnected the fragmented urban fabric and revitalized the damaged neighborhood.